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Darwin Correspondence Project

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Simon Conway Morris.jpg

Simon Conway Morris
Simon Conway Morris

Interview with Simon Conway Morris

Simon Conway Morris is professor of evolutionary paleobiology at the University of Cambridge and the author of books on early evolution (The Crucible of Creation, 1998) and evolutionary convergence (Life’s Solution, 2003). He discusses a wide range of issues, from the evidence of design in nature, to the status of Darwinism in modern biology, to the role that science can play in a reenchantment of nature.

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Interview with Pietro Corsi

Pietro Corsi is Professor of the History of Science at the University of Oxford. His book Evolution Before Darwin is due to be published in 2010 by Oxford University Press.

Date of interview: 17 July 2009

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Tim Lewens
Tim Lewens

Interview with Tim Lewens

Dr Tim Lewens is a Lecturer in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Organisms and artifacts (2004), which examines the language and arguments for design in biology and philosophy, and of Darwin (2007), which considers the role of Darwin and Darwinism in modern philosophy.

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Interview with Randal Keynes

Randal Keynes is a great-great-grandson of Charles Darwin, and the author of Annie’s Box (Fourth Estate, 2001), which discusses Darwin’s home life, his relationship with his wife and children, and the ways in which these influenced his feelings about nature and religion.

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Interview with John Hedley Brooke

John Hedley Brooke is President of the Science and Religion Forum as well as the author of the influential Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives (Cambridge University Press, 1991). He has had a long career in the history of science and religion, and was the first Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion at the University of Oxford.

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Capturing Darwin’s voice: audio of selected letters

On a sunny Wednesday in June 2011 in a makeshift recording studio somewhere in Cambridge, we were very pleased to welcome Terry Molloy back to the Darwin Correspondence Project for a special recording session. Terry, known for his portrayal of Davros in Dr Who and as the voice of Mike Tucker in The Archers, previously worked with us playing Charles Darwin in a dramatisation of the correspondence between Darwin and Asa Gray.

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It is like confessing a murder
http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/MS-DAR-00114-00003/4
It is like confessing a murder
CUL DAR 114: 3
Cambridge University Library

'Like confessing a murder' audio play

This speciallycommissioned BBC Radio drama is based entirely on Charles and Emma Darwin’s own words and correspondence. Behind the controversial public persona, Darwin was an affectionate family man, fully engaged – sometimes heartbreakingly so – in the lives of his wife, Emma and their children. 

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Face of emotion

The Project hosted an event on “The Face of Emotion” as part of the Cambridge Festival of Ideas in October 2011. Darwin’s work on expression was discussed in the context of current research in artificial intelligence, autism, and neuroscience.

Video or audio is available for the short talks that were given:

Dr Paul White of the Darwin Project on Charles Darwin's work on emotions

 

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Language: Interview with Gregory Radick

Darwin made a famous comment about parallels between changes in language and species change. Gregory Radick, Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at Leeds University, talks about the importance of the development of language to Darwin, what Darwin's letters tell us about his thinking, and assesses Darwin's impact on later study.

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The Darwin and Human Nature film series

We chose four films to cover a broad chronology from the early 19th to the early 20th century; and a range of themes, including teaching Darwinism, slavery and race, degeneration in Victorian society, the boundaries between normal and abnormal in the nineteenth-century sideshow, and the tension between science and art. We wanted a good mix between films that were difficult to see on the big screen and old favourites that deserved another airing.

The programme ran from 22 to 31 October 2012 at Cambridge Arts Picturehouse, as part of Cambridge Festival of Ideas.

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