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Darwin Correspondence Project

DCP-LETT-6896

To J. D. Hooker   18 [September 1869]1

Down. | Beckenham | Kent. S.E.

18th

My dear Hooker

We shall all be right glad to see you this day week; let us know Trains to Orpington & in all probability we can send to meet you.—

I much want a query answered.— Consult any of your colleagues learned in physiology.— When a large piece of bark is removed from a tree, does the bark ever regrow in isolated points, separate from the growing margins of the surrounding bark. I fancy I have heard that this is sometimes the case.— It bears on Pangenesis & on little powers of repair by plants.2

If you can answer in affirmative pray send me a line,—if I do not hear, I shall understand your answer is a negative—.

Yours affect, | C. Darwin

Footnotes

1
The month and year are established by the relationship between this letter and the letter from J. D. Hooker, 24 September 1869.
2
CD discussed the regrowth of bark in his letter to Scientific Opinion, [before 20 October 1869], drawing an analogy with the regrowth of amputated limbs in some animals. CD added a section on the regrowth of amputated parts to his discussion of pangenesis in the second edition of Variation (Variation 2d ed., 2: 357–9), but did not discuss plants.

Summary

Asks JDH to consult colleagues learned in physiology for answer to query: when a large piece of bark is removed from a tree, does the bark ever regrow in isolated points [separate] from the growing margin of the surrounding bark? Query bears on Pangenesis and on power of repair in plants.

Letter details

Letter no.
DCP-LETT-6896
From
Darwin, C. R.
To
Hooker, J. D.
Sent from
Down
Source of text
DAR 94: 153–4
Physical description
3pp †, †(by D . Oliver)

Please cite as

Darwin Correspondence Project, “Letter no. 6896,” accessed on 23 July 2016, http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/DCP-LETT-6896

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