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To Thomas Rivers   23 December [1862]

Summary

CD is collecting [for Variation] all accounts of what some call "sports" and what he calls "bud-variations". He asks whether very slight variations in fruit appear suddenly by buds, or whether only rather strongly marked varieties thus appear.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  23 Dec [1862]
Classmark:  Sotheby’s (dealers) (23–4 July 1987)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3874

To Thomas Rivers   28 December [1862]

Summary

Thanks for letter [missing] and help.

Asks about the effect said to be produced on the stock by a graft.

Health prevents accepting TR’s invitation.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  28 Dec [1862]
Classmark:  Sotheby’s (dealers) (23–4 July 1987)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3879

To Thomas Rivers   7 January [1863]

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Summary

Thanks for parcel of shoots with several interesting cases of "bud-variation".

Asks for information about roses.

Strange that great changes in peaches are less rare than slight ones and no case seems recorded of new apples or pears or apricots by "bud-variation". "How ignorant we are!"

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  7 Jan [1863]
Classmark:  DAR 185: 81
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3906

To Thomas Rivers   11 January [1863]

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Summary

Thanks for "rich and valuable" letter [missing].

Has read TR’s paper in Gardeners’ Chronicle ["Seedling fruits – plums", (1863): 27] – "a treasure to me".

Questions about seedling peaches that approach almonds.

Asks whether TR has ever observed varieties of plants growing close to other varieties for several generations without being affected by crossing.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  11 Jan [1863]
Classmark:  DAR 185: 82
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3910

To Thomas Rivers   15 January [1863]

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Summary

Particularly interested in TR’s information about peaches. Accepts offer of double-flowering peach-trees.

Will build a small hothouse for experiments.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  15 Jan [1863]
Classmark:  DAR 185: 83
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3918

To Thomas Rivers   17 [January 1863]

Summary

Can TR distinguish generally, always, or never, a nectarine-tree from a peach-tree before it flowers or before it fruits? He wants to quote TR’s answer.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  17 [Jan 1863]
Classmark:  John Wilson (dealer) (catalogue 61, 21 July 1989, item 50)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3922

From Thomas Rivers   21 January 1863

Summary

Sends some trees to CD.

Would be pleased to receive the copy of Origin offered by CD as gift.

Will give CD any tree or shrub he may want.

Refers to curious strawberry hybrids noticed in Journal of Horticulture [I. Anderson-Henry, "Crossing strawberries", J. Hortic. n.s. 4 (1863): 45–6].

Author:  Thomas Rivers
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  21 Jan 1863
Classmark:  DAR 176: 160
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3933

To Thomas Rivers   25 January [1863]

Summary

Has received the two trees sent by TR. Is anxious to see the fruit of the double peach.

The Origin is being sent.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  25 Jan [1863]
Classmark:  Maggs Brothers (catalogue 1086)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3942

From Thomas Rivers   26 January 1863

Summary

Thanks CD for Origin.

TR has often thought naturalists do not pay enough attention to the effect of site, soil, and climate on animals and plants and "hence has arisen the enormous number of so-called species".

His observations on people of different counties.

Author:  Thomas Rivers
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  26 Jan 1863
Classmark:  DAR 176: 161
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3946

From Thomas Rivers   30 January 1863

Summary

Asks CD’s views on TR’s observations that leaves breathe from their under-surfaces.

Peach-trees in hothouses cannot be kept in health unless fresh air is admitted so as to make its way under the leaves.

Continues his observations on the effect of environment on men – those migrating to America gradually assuming Indian-like features.

Author:  Thomas Rivers
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  30 Jan 1863
Classmark:  DAR 176: 162
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3955

To Thomas Rivers   1 February [1863]

Summary

Answers TR’s query about stomata.

CD will use "weeping trees" as an example of how inexplicable the laws of inheritance are, and asks for facts on character of seedlings.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  1 Feb [1863]
Classmark:  Sotheby’s (dealers) (23–4 July 1987)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3962

From Thomas Rivers   [3 February 1863]

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Summary

His observations of "selection" in growth of seedling trees.

Author:  Thomas Rivers
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [3 Feb 1863]
Classmark:  DAR 46.1: 95
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3965

To Thomas Rivers   [14 February 1863]

Summary

Delighted by curious case of inheritance in the weeping ash [cited in missing letter from TR] "which produced weeping seedlings and itself lost the weeping peculiarity!" Wishes he could get authentic information on the weeping elm.

What TR says of seedlings conquering each other well illustrates struggle for existence and natural selection.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  [14 Feb 1863]
Classmark:  19th Century Shop (catalogue 5, 1988)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3982

To Thomas Rivers   5 March [1863]

Summary

Thanks for information on weeping trees; asks for a few weeping elm seeds.

The double peach is in flower; the almond has not flowered; will beg a specimen of fruit later.

Has been unwell.

Tells of Hooker’s admiration for TR’s articles.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  5 Mar [1863]
Classmark:  Sotheby, London (23–4 July 1987)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4023

To Thomas Rivers   [9 May 1863]

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Summary

Doubts the fruit will stick on his Chinese double peach and asks TR to send him a couple when ripe.

Would like to grow seeds of the "curious monstrosity" of a wall-flower, to see whether the monstrosity is hereditary.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  [9 May 1863]
Classmark:  DAR 185: 84
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4150

To Thomas Rivers   17 August [1863]

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Summary

The almond-tree TR gave him produced no fruit, but the Chinese double peach has three. Asks for ripe almond fruits and any odd peaches, to compare the stones.

Asks about modification in fruit or foliage in any fruit-trees from being grafted,

and about seedlings of pears and wheat said to have been found in hedges and woods.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  17 Aug [1863]
Classmark:  DAR 185: 85
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4270

From Thomas Rivers   6 January [1865]

Summary

Thanks CD for his paper on Lythrum [Collected papers 2: 106–31].

Astonished by CD’s powers of observation and perseverance.

His elms raised from three varieties of weeping elms are doing well.

Author:  Thomas Rivers
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  6 Jan [1865]
Classmark:  DAR 176: 163
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4381

From Thomas Rivers   6 July 1865

Summary

Thanks CD for "Climbing plants" [see 4861].

Encloses sketch of a climbing French bean.

Tells of a row of non-climbing haricot beans that in good season put out slender climbing shoots.

He has the peach almond in fruit this season.

Author:  Thomas Rivers
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  6 July 1865
Classmark:  DAR 176: 164
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4866

To Thomas Rivers   27 April [1866]

Summary

Asks for racemes of Cytisus purpureus-elongatus and C. adami for comparison, because Robert Caspary argues that C. adami is not a common hybrid.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Rivers
Date:  27 Apr [1866]
Classmark:  Remember When Auctions (Cat. 41)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5070

From Thomas Rivers   17 May 1866

Summary

Will be sure to send the Cytisus and Laburnum blooms when they flower.

Author:  Thomas Rivers
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  17 May 1866
Classmark:  DAR 176: 165
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5094
Document type
letter (31)
Author
Addressee
Correspondent
Date
1862 (2)
1863 (14)
1865 (2)
1866 (8)
1867 (2)
1868 (1)
1872 (2)
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