skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache/2.4.7 (Ubuntu) Server at cudl-live.internal.cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 80
Search:
in keywords
9 Items

John Murray

Summary

Darwin's most famous book On the origin of species by means of natural selection (Origin) was published on 22 November 1859. The publisher was John Murray, who specialised in non-fiction, particularly politics, travel and science, and had published…

Matches: 15 hits

  • was published on 22 November 1859. The publisher was John Murray, who specialised in non-fiction, …
  • series of guides and also published travel books. Successive John Murrays ran the publishing house; …
  • University Library  a similar number of letters from John Murray and Robert Cooke, his cousin and
  • had proved to be a scientific best-seller for the second John Murray, to open negotiations with his
  • began the business relationship between Charles Darwin and John Murray. Darwins next
  • Navy: and adapted for travellers in general  edited by John Herschel, but there was an error at
  • … . Again he asked Lyell to act as his intermediary with John Murray ( Letter 2437 ), who, without
  • …  would be a success: shortly before publication he wrote to Murray, ‘I heartily hope that my Book
  • undertaken it’ (15 October [1859] Letter 2506 ). Murray decided on a retail price of 14 s ., …
  • … ([3 November 1859] Letter 2514 ). In the event, all Murrays stock of Origin  was sold on the
  • was immediately called for ( Letter 2549 ). In the end Murray paid Darwin £180 for the first
  • had paid Darwin profits of nearly £3000. The third John Murray made a successful business
  • … ). Darwins next publishing project with John Murray in 1869 was a translation into English
  • in the  Quarterly Review , a magazine published by John Murray.The pamphlets were not primarily
  • his orders ( Letter 8616 ). However, when Robert Cooke, John Murrays cousin, went round to

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 11 hits

  • to spread my views’, he wrote to his publisher, John Murray, on 30 January , shortly after
  • The public are accustomed to novels for 1s’, he wrote to Murray on 8 January , but Murray
  • the new edition in the United States, Darwin arranged with Murray to have it stereotyped. Before the
  • Hookers cause was taken up by his friends, in particular John Lubbock and John Tyndall, as one
  • to Gladstone a week later ( enclosure to letter from John Lubbock to WEGladstone, 20 June 1872
  • rights and the photographic plates with his overseas publishers, and with John Murrays assistant, …
  • of the booksellers, encouraged an originally cautious John Murray to gamble on the books success: & …
  • attractive dishes in his `Literary Banquet’ (letters from John Murray, 6 November [1872] and 9
  • in those born blind, and filed away other letters, but Murrays confidence proved misplaced; demand
  • to supply comparative observations, and Darwins protégé John Scott, now employed as a curator in
  • a copy of  Expression  to another old Cambridge friend, John Maurice Herbert, who when they were

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 24 hits

  • trouble in finding a copy. Having sent back his own to the publishers, he applied first to his
  • had been in two volumes and had cost twenty-four shillings.) Murrays partner, Robert Francis Cooke, …
  • Quarterly Review  discussing works on primitive man by John Lubbock and Edward Burnett Tylor. It
  • of anonymous reviews. Its proprietor was none other than John Murray, Darwins publisher. So
  • wording of both the letter to the editor and the letter to Murray to accompany it. The depth of
  • a new publisherand advised that Darwin should not push Murray to the point of cutting off
  • … [6 or 7 August 1874] ). When the letter was finally sent to Murray, Darwin referred only to their
  • … ‘asking a favour ‘. He explained why he had written to Murray and not the editor of the  Quarterly
  • to review me in a hostile spirit’ ( letter to John Murray, 11 August 1874 ). Darwin was
  • St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwins relief, Murray replied immediately: ‘I have lost
  • number of the Review & in the same type’  ( letter from John Murray, 12 August 1874 ). George
  • anonymous reviews. While staying with Hooker over Christmas, John Tyndall, professor at and
  • asthe natural outflow of his character’ ( letter from John Tyndall, 28 December 1874 ). …
  • to purchase the wooded land, which he had been renting from John Lubbock, led to a straining of
  • the sale was agreed in April for £300 ( letter from John Lubbock, 2 April 1874 ), a high price
  • for about a week ( letter from E. E. Klein, 14 May 1874 ). John Burdon Sanderson sent the results
  • of other insect-eating plants. The surgeon and botanist John Ralfs sent  Utricularia  from
  • in order to work on its difficult structures ( letter to John Ralfs, 13 July [1874] ). The
  • a printed appeal for funds, raising £860 ( Circular to John Lubbock, P. L. Sclater, Charles Lyell, …
  • from E. A. Darwin, 17 [March 1874] ). He tried to persuade John Murray to publish a second edition
  • authority on marriage customs in  Descent  ( see letter John Murray, 9 May [1874] ). He
  • for Darwins last years. The young physiologist George John Romanes wrote a long letter to Herbert
  • established by Michael Foster. He then studied under John Scott Burdon Sanderson at University
  • August in Belfast, several papers featured Darwins work. John Tyndall asked Darwin to glance over

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … of scientific admirers at Down, among them Robert Caspary, John Traherne Moggridge, and Ernst …
  • … regime led to Darwin’s being teased by his neighbour, John Lubbock, about the prospect of riding to …
  • … with our beagles before the season is over’ ( letter from John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More …
  • … On 21 February Darwin received notification from John Murray that stocks of the third edition of  …
  • … George Henslow, the son of his Cambridge mentor, John Stevens Henslow, stayed for two days in April …
  • … In June, Darwin was visited by the orchid specialist John Traherne Moggridge, whose work on the self …
  • … in Germany is indicated by correspondence with several publishers who sought permission to translate …
  • … out, ‘business would be totally paralysed’. Similarly, John Murray gave as a reason for his decision …
  • … ‘gaieties travelling & War Bulletins’ ( letter from John Murray, 18 July 1866 ). I …
  • … for the criminal prosecution of the colonial governor Edward John Eyre. In his efforts to suppress …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 9 hits

  • the accuracy of Darwins words has been questioned by John L. Brooks and by H. Lewis McKinney, both
  • Lyell, 28 March [1859] ). Lyell suggested the firm of John Murray, publishers of the second edition
  • … , for his opinion. Elwins long and considered reply to Murray is published in this volume. Despite
  • to the original plan of his book (see letter from Elwin to Murray, 3 May 1859 , and letter to
  • In particular, he was anxious about the prospects of Murray recovering his expenses and even offered
  • … (letters to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] , and to John Murray, 10 September [1859] ), but
  • 24 November 1859 ). Equally painful was the news that John Frederick William Herschel, whom he so
  • comments in notices of and letters about his book. He told Murray, ‘I fear all Reviews of my present
  • would change their minds without good cause.’ ( letter to John Murray, 2 December [1859] ). …

The writing of "Origin"

Summary

From a quiet rural existence at Down in Kent, filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on the transmutation of species, Darwin was jolted into action in 1858 by the arrival of an unexpected letter (no longer extant) from Alfred Russel Wallace outlining a…

Matches: 9 hits

  • the accuracy of Darwins words has been questioned by John L. Brooks and by H. Lewis McKinney, both
  • Lyell, 28 March [1859] ). Lyell suggested the firm of John Murray, publishers of the second
  • … , for his opinion. Elwins long and considered reply to Murray is published in this volume. Despite
  • to the original plan of his book (see letter from Elwin to Murray, 3 May 1859 , and letter to
  • In particular, he was anxious about the prospects of Murray recovering his expenses and even offered
  • … (letters to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] , and to John Murray, 10 September [1859] ), but
  • 24 November 1859 ). Equally painful was the news that John Frederick William Herschel, whom he so
  • comments in notices of and letters about his book. He told Murray, ‘I fear all Reviews of my present
  • would change their minds without good cause.’ (letter to John Murray, 2 December [1859] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … and amphibians, while Roland Trimen in South Africa and John Jenner Weir in London sent more …
  • … book ( Descent ). As European and North American publishers sought to secure the rights to …
  • … and broadening the forums in which Darwinism was discussed. John Murray brought out the first issue …
  • … that to me would have been a pleasing sight’ ( letter to John Murray, [after 18 September 1869] ). …

Who we are

Summary

Many people have contributed to the Darwin Correspondence Project since it was first founded in 1974. Some names are now lost to us, and we would appreciate hearing from anyone who has contributed in the past and is not listed here. Current staff are…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … author of Darwin: All that matters, published in 2015 by John Murray Learning.  Alison is …
  • … and the material culture of science and medicine. With John Pickstone and Julie Anderson, he is the …
  • … in the classroom to Darwin Inspired Learning (Sense Publishers, 2015). She is now working on …
  • … Sheldon  Stephen V. Pocock Duncan Porter John A. Reesman  Marsha L. Richmond …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … apparently as a result of thinking about the significance of John Gould’s and Richard Owen’s …
  • … record of Darwin’s arrangements with the Treasury, his publishers, and others involved in the …
  • … Owen;  Mammalia , by G. R. Waterhouse;  Birds , by John Gould;  Fish , by Leonard Jenyns; and  …
  • … entrusted to Thomas Bell, subsequently purchased by John Obadiah Westwood, first Hope Professor of …
letter