skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache/2.4.7 (Ubuntu) Server at cudl-live.internal.cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 80
Search:
in keywords
75 Items
Page:  1 2 3 4  Next

Francis Darwin

Summary

Known to his family as ‘Frank’, Charles Darwin’s seventh child himself became a distinguished scientist. He was an undergraduate at Trinity College, Cambridge, initially studying mathematics, but then transferring to natural sciences.  Francis completed…

Matches: 8 hits

  • Known to his family asFrank’, Charles Darwins seventh child himself became a distinguished
  • but then transferring to natural sciencesFrancis completed his studies at Cambridge, …
  • into debt and had kept the matter secret for some months. Darwin was very stern in his advice: ‘I
  • an old fellow as I daresay I appear to you’ (letter to Francis Darwin18 October [1870] ). …
  • engaged to Amy Ruck in 1872; the couple married in 1874. Francis was already living in Down. and
  • a laboratory run by Julius von Sachs in WurzburgFrancis Darwin was elected to the Royal
  • his father had not been knighted, although in 1877 Charles Darwin was awarded an honorary degree
  • … ( The Power of Movement in Plants, 1880). Perhaps Francis Darwin, whom the family regarded as a

Francis Darwin marries

Summary

The Darwins' son, Francis, marries Amy Ruck; Francis starts work as his father's assistant

Matches: 1 hits

  • … The Darwins' son, Francis, marries Amy Ruck; Francis starts work as his father's assistant …

Francis Galton

Summary

Galton was a naturalist, statistician, and evolutionary theorist. He was a second cousin of Darwin’s, having descended from his grandfather, Erasmus. Born in Birmingham in 1822, Galton studied medicine at King’s College, London, and also read mathematics…

Matches: 11 hits

  • and evolutionary theorist. He was a second cousin of Darwins, having descended from his grandfather
  • a natural historical narrative of the journey (Galton 1853). Darwin enjoyed and admired Galtons
  • Hereditary Genius (1869), which contained an entry on the Darwin family, including theauthor of
  • for subjects of natural history”. Shortly after Darwin published his preliminary hypothesis
  • on rabbits to test the theory. He reported regularly to Darwin on these experiments, which involved
  • Royal Society claiming that his results tended to disprove Darwins theory (Galton 1871). This
  • 1871 ). His views on inheritance continued to diverge from Darwins, however. He studied cases of
  • Galton shared his views in several lengthy letters, but Darwin struggled with the abstract reasoning
  • and infirmities, with the aim of improving the population. Darwin was less optimistic about such a
  • … ( 4 January [1873] ). Like most of his contemporaries, Darwin continued to believe in the
  • men of science: their nature and nurture (Galton 1874), Darwin insisted that he had no particular

Power of movement in plants

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Family experiments Darwin was an active and engaged father during his children's youth, involving them in his experiments and even occasionally using them as observational subjects. When his children…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … | Experiment Family experiments Darwin was an active and engaged father during
  • Man (1872). This teaching module focuses on work done by Darwin with his son Francis on
  • and his role as an attentive and affectionate father. Darwin's letters to Francis mix advice on
  • notice that although they come from the last decade of Darwins life, he is still interested in his
  • move In The Power of movement in plants Darwin continued his experiments with and
  • in behavioral responses. In the conclusion of the book Darwin argues that gradual modifications in
  • SOURCES Books Darwin, C.R. The power of movement in plants. 1880. London: …
  • of movement in plants Letter 7346 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 18 October 1870
  • compromising their character. Letter 10517 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 29 May 1876
  • they would be worth making. Letter 11628 - Francis Darwin to Darwin, 24 July 1878

Francis Darwin born

Summary

Son, Francis Darwin, born

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Son, Francis Darwin, born …

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 19 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1876 on this website.  The full texts
  • 24 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • the first member of the next generation of the family, with Francis and Amys child expected in
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his
  • had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his
  • When Smith, Elder and Company proposed reissuing two of Darwins three volumes of the geology of
  • Darwin reassured his close friend Joseph Hooker that he and Francis would attend the meeting. Darwin
  • subject takes an opposite line’. Although he conceded that Francis had the best of an argument with
  • to propose the young rising star of Cambridge morphology, Francis Maitland Balfour, for fellowship
  • of the earliest available commercial models of typewriter. Francis Darwin and his wife, Amy, …
  • point, and he was reliant on his son George and cousin Francis Galton for the calculations. ‘I have
  • in their research. He revelled in the praise heaped on Francis by George Henry Lewes for an article
  • chemical pycrotoxine in vivisection experiments ( letter to Francis Darwin, [1 May 1876] ). Darwin
  • 2 May [1876] ). Darwin even cautioned the otherwise healthy Francis, ‘Take care and do not overwork
  • first time to a large and healthy boy, the son of Amy and Francis. Just four days later, Darwin had

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 24 hits

  • evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost
  • … (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwins son Francis became increasingly
  • career to become his fathers scientific secretary. Darwin had always relied on assistance from
  • the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • some of which were incorporated in a later edition. Darwin also contributed to discussions in the
  • in animals. The subject was brought closer to home by Francis Galtons work on inherited talent, …
  • Station at Naples. Plants that eat and feel? Darwin had resumed experiments on the
  • 12 January [1873] ).  Drosera  was the main focus of Darwins study of insectivorous plants, a
  • and alkaloids, and even electrical stimulation. On sending Darwin a specimen of the carnivorous  …
  • … ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ). Darwin found that the glandular hairs on the
  • to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this transmission of
  • plants , p. 63). The plants secreted a viscid fluid, which Darwin suspected attracted insects by
  • … ., p. 17). Through a series of painstaking experiments, Darwin determined that the secretions
  • botanist Mary Treat, who performed experiments suggested by Darwin on the North American species  …
  • Poisons and electrocution . . . His son Francis was assisting the histologist Edward Emanuel
  • of medical research in London. On the advice of Klein, Francis obtained a new microscope for his
  • on botany, he drew more on assistance from his son Francis. While visiting his fiancée, Amy Ruck, in
  • notes and take tracings of their burrows” ( letter from Francis Darwin, 14 August [1873] ). …
  • … [1873] ).  Shortly afterwards, it was arranged for Francis to rent a house in the village (Down
  • to H. E. Litchfield, 20 February 1873 ). The surgeon Francis Stephen Bennet Francois de Chaumont, …
  • of instinct and inheritance when he was asked by his cousin Francis Galton to participate in a study
  • aims but regarded the project asutopian” ( letter to Francis Galton, 4 January [1873] ). …
  • and investing money very well” ( letter to Francis Galton, 28 May 1873 ). Among character traits, …
  • his own character, he asked his sons to complete the list. Francis added to his fathers virtues: …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 28 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can
  • of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwins last, and of  Expression of the
  • books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred
  • …  27 July [1872] ). By the end of the year Darwin was immersed in two of the studies that
  • of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwins last bookThe formation of   …
  • worms , published in the year before his deathDespite Darwins declared intention to take up new
  • begun many years before. In his private life also, Darwin was in a nostalgic frame of mind, …
  • The last word on Origin The year opened with Darwin, helped by his eldest son William, …
  • on 30 January , shortly after correcting the proofs, and Darwins concern for the consolidation of
  • and sixth editions were costly to incorporate, and despite Darwins best efforts, set the final
  • closely involved in every stage of publication of his books, Darwin was keen to ensure that this
  • to bring out the new edition in the United States, Darwin arranged with Murray to have it
  • had to be resetThe investment in stereotype reinforced Darwins intention to make no further
  • A worsening breach The criticisms against which Darwin had taken the greatest trouble to
  • objections to the theory of natural selection’, Darwin refuted point by point assertions published
  • Although Mivart was among those who wrote in January to wish Darwin a happy new year, before the
  • critical and anonymously published review of  Descent . Darwins supporters had rallied to his
  • The republication of Wrights paper had been arranged by Darwin himself (see  Correspondence  vol. …
  • so bigotted a person as I am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St GJMivart, 5
  • that he would willingly acknowledge himself at fault if only Darwin would renounce `fundamental
  • letter to St GJMivart, 8 January [1872] ).  Despite Darwins request that he drop the
  • … ( letter from St GJMivart,  10 January 1872 ).  Darwin, determined to have the last word in
  • 11 January [1872] ). 'I hate controversy,’ Darwin wrote later in the year, possibly with this
  • … ( letter to ARWallace, 3 August [1872] ).  Darwin's theories under siege
  • drawings shortly afterwards ( letter from Samuel Butler to Francis Darwin, [before 30 May 1872] , …
  • the claims of spiritualists, and Darwin, through his cousin Francis Galton, had with some interest
  • however, incorporated in the second edition, produced by Francis Darwin after his fathers death. …
  • new name on the list of volunteers: by the beginning of May, Francis Darwin, the Darwinsthird son, …

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 25 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the rest of the year was devoted
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwins evolutionary account of the
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression. Darwin continued to investigate the
  • also brought a significant milestone for the family, as Darwins eldest daughter Henrietta was
  • during several past years, has been a great amusement’. Darwin had been working fairly continuously
  • work on species theory in the late 1830s. In recent years, Darwin had collected a wealth of material
  • to human evolution was comparatively small, reflecting Darwins aim of  showing kinship with animals
  • he istorn to piecesby people wanting copies’, Darwin wrote to his son Francis on 28 February
  • letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ). The profits for Darwin were considerable. After
  • man.’ Promoting the book As usual, Darwin did his best to obtain a wide and favourable
  • … (see Correspondence vol. 19Appendix IV). Four of Darwins five sons received a copy, and his
  • received a special acknowledgment in the form of a gift. Darwin credited her for whatever he had
  • … ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). Reaction
  • 1871). The geologist William Boyd Dawkins remarked on Darwins booksreception amongstartisans
  • liberal or orthodox. The American philosopher and journalist Francis Ellingwood Abbot incorporated
  • man & we were the best of friends’, he wrote to his son Francis on 28 February . However, …
  • Darwin had been receiving regular reports from his cousin Francis Galton on the progress of
  • in order to facilitate cross-circulation ( letter from Francis Galton, 13 September 1871 ). …
  • science ( letter to Horace Darwin, [15 December 1871] ). Francis was now studying medicine at St
  • of Trinity College, planned a trip to America, and invited Francis and two Cambridge friends. Darwin
  • …  be almost superhuman virtue to give it up’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 16 May [1871] ). Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 27 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1877 on this website.  The full texts
  • 25 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • Ever since the publication of Expression , Darwins research had centred firmly on botany. The
  • of these projects would culminate in a major publication. Darwins botany was increasingly a
  • assisted his fathers research on movement and bloom, and Darwin in turn encouraged his sons own
  • The year 1877 was more than usually full of honours. Darwin received two elaborate photograph albums
  • from Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands. Closer to home, Darwin received an honorary Doctorate of
  • sites for possible earthworm activity. Now in his 69th year, Darwin remained remarkably productive, …
  • no controversy. In his autobiographical reflections, Darwin remarked: ‘no little discovery of
  • … (‘Recollections’, p. 419). During the winter and spring, Darwin was busy preparing the manuscript of
  • and presented to the Linnean Society of London. In the book, Darwin adopted the more recent term
  • as dimorphic without comparing pollen-grains & stigmas’, Darwin remarked to Joseph Dalton
  • measurements of the size and number of pollen-grains, Darwin compared the fertility of individual
  • primrose and purple loosestrife. In the course of his work, Darwin found a number of other
  • dreadful work making out anything about dried flowers’, Darwin complained to Asa Gray on 8 March
  • which include heterstyled species. This pleases me.’. Darwin dedicated the book to Gray, ‘as a small
  • In the end, Darwin did not publish on the subject, but Francis later reported some of the results of
  • 25 August 1877 ). At Down House, Darwin and Francis devised a method of recording leaf
  • with thread, card, and bits of glass. Encouraging Francis Darwin greatly enjoyed
  • eminent German botanist Ferdinand Julius Cohn, who confirmed Franciss observations: ‘the most
  • Infusoria’ ( letter from F. J. Cohn, 5 August 1877 ). Franciss paper eventually appeared in the
  • had visited Down House and become friendly with George and Francis. He wrote to Francis on 24
  • … ‘As fornatural selection”’, he wrote to Francis on 25 November , ‘frankly to me it now seems a
  • for he began to receive petitions from strangers. The writer Francis Lloyd, who was in poor health
  • for his further work. Lloyd had written a critique of Francis Galtons theory of heredity in 1876, …
  • will allow me to send you a cheque for £10’ ( letter to [Francis Lloyd], 1 May [1877] ). Another
  • In the end, Darwin made the journey along with Emma. George, Francis, and Horace also attended. The

Volume 24 (1876) now available

Summary

Birth, tragic death . . . and cardigan jackets.  Volume 24 of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin is now available.  Read more about Darwin's life in 1876 here.

Matches: 7 hits

  • The year 1876 started energetically, with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • in August and the book was published by John Murray, Darwins usual publisher, in November; he
  • small quantity of work left in me for new matter. Darwin had to be disciplined about his
  • second edition of Orchids was published in January 1877; Darwin had been working on it since May
  • Annies death, though not so grievous to me. Darwins daughter-in-law, Amy, died a few
  • his parents; Emma and Charles took on the care of the baby. Francis too took refuge in work, …
  • from a recently discovered collection of letters to Charles Darwin from his son William. They reveal

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 23 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from 1874 on this website.  The full texts of the
  • 22 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • … ). The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwins cousin, William Darwin Fox, to
  • from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one
  • I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a weeks visit to
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in
  • 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of
  • by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too
  • the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwins cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those
  • imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it wasall imposture’ …
  • stop word getting to America of thestrange newsthat Darwin had alloweda spirit séanceat his
  • had cost twenty-four shillings.) Murrays partner, Robert Francis Cooke, informed Darwin that the
  • … (see G. B. Airy ed. 1881). Darwins third son Francis married Amy Ruck, the sister of a
  • work on insectivorous plants. Amy drew a plant and Francis was disappointed that they seemed not to
  • from Cornwall, but Darwin was unwell when it arrived, so Francis worked on the tiny bladders under
  • 1874 , and  Correspondence  vol. 21, letter from Francis Darwin,  [11 October 1873] ). …
  • work’ ( letter to D. F. Nevill, 18 September [1874] ).Franciss new wife, Amy, drew the plant ( …
  • After his wife read  Expression , the military surgeon Francis François de Chaumont sent
  • a donation of £100, and £10 each from his sons George and Francis ( letter to Anton Dohrn, 7 March
  • a photograph of the station to be sent to Darwin by Francis Maitland Balfour; Darwin offered to try

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins
  • … . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] Mary Barber
  • Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] …
  • Darwin, [9 January 1871] Darwins brother-in-law, Francis, reports on the appearance and
  • tells her eldest son, William, that her third eldest son, Francis, is receiving help with his plant
  • February 1857] Darwins nephew, Edmund, writes to Francis with the results of his
  • in his home. Letter 10517  - Darwin to Francis, F., [29 May 1876] Darwin
  • Letter 10517  - Darwin t o Francis, F., [29 May 1876] Darwin gives his son, Francis

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 28 hits

  • At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  …
  • appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘My work will have to stop a
  • material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwins interests remained extremely broad, and
  • plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to
  • Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwins most substantial addition to  Origin  was a
  • a Swiss botanist and professor at Munich (Nägeli 1865). Darwin had considered Nägelis paper
  • principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägelis theory
  • in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now
  • are & must be morphological’. The comment highlights Darwins apparent confusion about Nägelis
  • … ‘purely morphological’. The modern reader may well share Darwins uncertainty, but Nägeli evidently
  • pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical examples he could use
  • problems of heredity Another important criticism that Darwin sought to address in the fifth
  • prevailing theory of blending inheritance that Jenkin and Darwin both shared, would tend to be lost
  • … ( Origin  5th ed., pp. 1034). The terminology that Darwin and others employed in these matters ( …
  • … ‘I must have expressed myself atrociously’, Darwin wrote to Alfred Russel Wallace on 2 February , …
  • of  Origin  was the result of correspondence between Darwin and the geologist James Croll. In the
  • but it was his theory of alternate ice ages that piqued Darwins interest the most. He wrote, ‘this
  • … ( letter to James Croll, 31 January [1869] ). Darwin had argued ( Origin , pp. 3778) that plant
  • would always exist. In  Origin  5th ed., pp. 45061, Darwin accounted for the survival of tropical
  • James Croll31 January [1869] ). Croll could not supply Darwin with an estimate of the age of the
  • … ( letter from James Croll, 4 February 1869 ).  Darwin did not directly challenge Thomsons
  • 19 March [1869] ). Towards Descent Once Darwin had completed revisions of the
  • and overseas. The dog-breeder George Cupples worked hard on Darwins behalf, sending a steady stream
  • of concern were received for months afterwards. Francis Galton: Hereditary genius and
  • Emma read aloud from a new book by Darwins half-cousin, Francis Galton. The workHereditary
  • is an eminently  important difference’ ( letter to Francis Galton23 December [1869] ). …
  • of inheritance through experiments on rabbits ( letter from Francis Galton, 11 December 1869 ). …
  • the first to give me freedom of thought’ ( letter from Francis Galton, 24 December 1869 ). …

All Darwin's letters from 1873 go online for the anniversary of Origin

Summary

To celebrate the 158th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species on 24 November, the full transcripts and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. Read about Darwin's life in 1873 through his…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. …
  • … father or an atheist. Here are some highlights from Darwin's correspondence in 1873: …
  • … to J. D. Hooker, 23 October [1873] ) In 1873, Darwin continued work on insectivorous …
  • … , published in 1875. Investigating the sundew's sensitivity, Darwin found that the glandular …
  • … to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this transmission of …
  • … When he jokingly mentioned his need for staff, his son Francis proposed that he give up his medical …
  • … appeared anonymously in the Edinburgh Review in April. Darwin asked one of his Scottish …
  • … to T. H. Huxley, 23 April 1873 ) Darwin wrote this to Thomas Henry Huxley, in the hope …
  • … some love of the new and marvellous  ( Letter to Francis Galton, 28 May 1873 ) …
  • … investing money very well; very methodical in my habits.' Francis added to his father's …

The "wicked book": Origin at 157

Summary

Origin is 157 years old.  (Probably) the most famous book in science was published on 24 November 1859.  To celebrate we have uploaded hundreds of new images of letters, bringing the total number you can look at here to over 9000 representing more than…

Matches: 7 hits

  • book appeared.   You can now see examples of letters to Darwin from nearly 250 different people, and
  • Lyell , and Joseph Hooker , the two men who arranged for Darwins and Wallaces ideas to be made
  • Asa Gray who was an important sounding board for Darwins emerging ideas, and Thomas Huxley
  • scrap from 1857 comparing his views on species to DarwinsOthers, like Hugh Falconer , …
  • the less well-known scientific collaborators who became Darwin's correspondents, Mary Treat
  • several of their children: William, George, Henrietta , Francis , Leonard, and Horace. Francis
  • of water thrown over me on rising William Darwin Fox , Charless cousin and another

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’ Darwin confessed in January1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months. January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 26 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from 1875 on this website.  The full texts of the
  • 23 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • Editions Plants always held an important place in Darwins theorising about species, and
  • his periods of severe illness. Yet on 15 January 1875 , Darwin confessed to his close friend
  • way to continuous writing and revision, activities that Darwin found less gratifying: ‘I am slaving
  • bad.’ The process was compounded by the fact that Darwin was also revising another manuscript
  • coloured stamens.’ At intervals during the year, Darwin was diverted from the onerous task of
  • zoologist St George Jackson Mivart. In April and early May, Darwin was occupied with a heated
  • chapter of the controversy involved a slanderous attack upon Darwins son George, in an anonymous
  • on 12 January , breaking off all future communication. Darwin had been supported during the affair
  • Society of London, and a secretary of the Linnean Society, Darwins friends had to find ways of
  • pp. 1617). ‘How grandly you have defended me’, Darwin wrote on 6 January , ‘You have also
  • in public. ‘Without cutting him direct’, he advised Darwin on 7 January , ‘I should avoid him, …
  • … & again’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 January 1875 ). Darwin had also considered taking up
  • … , ‘I feel now like a pure forgiving Christian!’ Darwins ire was not fully spent, however, …
  • in the same Quarterly article that attacked George. Darwin raised the matter at the end of the
  • to rest, another controversy was brewing. In December 1874, Darwin had been asked to sign a memorial
  • Hensleigh and Frances Wedgwood. She had corresponded with Darwin about the evolution of the moral
  • Darwin had become acquainted with Klein when his son Francis was studying medicine in London. Klein
  • performed on animals in previous years by Darwins cousin Francis Galton. These had been
  • manuscripts and proofs, Darwin now relied heavily on his son Francis, who had made the decision in
  • wrote, ‘I beg ten thousand pardon & more’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, [ c . February 1875?] …
  • plants , and moved on to Variation 2d ed., Francis signed himself, ‘Your affect sonthe
  • 219.1: 89). The most eminent of Darwins guests was Francis, duke of Teck, a German prince
  • Darwin could not keep up, and on 22 July , he had Francis reply: ‘My Father desires me to say
  • on 2 December, the same meeting at which Romanes and Francis Darwin were made fellows. But Thiselton

Casting about: Darwin on worms

Summary

Earthworms featured in the news announcement in May 2014 that a citizen science project had been launched to map the distribution of earthworms across Britain (BBC Today programme, 26 May 2014). The general understanding of the role earthworms play in…

Matches: 12 hits

  • for plants to flourish can be traced back to the last book Darwin wrote, snappily-titled The
  • on their habits, which was published in 1881. Despite Darwins fears that a book on earthworms might
  • out in his Natural History of Selborne of 1789 (a book Darwin claimed hadmuch influence on my
  • a new field in natural history, and almost a century later Darwin argued that all fields had passed
  • variety of strange things he persuaded people to do. Darwin concluded that worms had no sense
  • of a metal whistle and to being shouted at, but also to Francis Darwin playing the bassoon, and to
  • made calculations about larger castings on poorer soils, and Francis helped with calculations
  • … . After a while, looking for earthworm