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Darwin Correspondence Project

Historical sources

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin-traps, was privately printed in July, and Emma organised the distribution of the pamphlet in August and September 1863 (see letter from G. B. Sowerby Jr to Emma Darwin, 22 July 1863 and n. 1, and letters from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [6–27 September 1863], 29 September [1863], and 8 December [1863]).

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Vivisection: Darwin's testimony to the Royal Commission

Wednesday, 3rd November 1875.

Mr. Charles Darwin called in and examined.

4661. (Chairman.) We are very sensible of your kindness in coming at some sacrifice to yourself to express your opinions to the Commission. We attribute it to the great interest which we know you take in the subject referred to us, both on the score of science and also on the score of humanity?

— Yes, I have felt a great interest in it.

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Vivisection: first sketch of the bill

Strictly Confidential

Mem: This print is only a first sketch. It is being now recast with a new & more simple form – but the substance of the proposed measure may be equally well seen in this draft.

R.B.L. | 2

586 Darwin and vivisection

EXPERIMENTS ON ANIMALS.

Sketch of Bill, No. 1

Arrangement of sections.

Preamble.

Section 1. —Authority to make experiments may be granted by Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for the Home Department.

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Vivisection: BAAS committee report

Report British Assoc. Edinburgh 1871 p. 144

I No experiment which can be performed under the influence of an anasthetic ought to be done without it.

II No painful experiment is justifiable for the mere purpose of illustrating a law or fact already demonstrated; in other words, experimentation without the employment of anasthetics is not a fitting exhibition for teaching purposes.

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Essay: Evolutionary teleology

—by Asa Gray

EVOLUTIONARY TELEOLOGY

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Essay: What is Darwinism?

—by Asa Gray

WHAT IS DARWINISM?

The Nation, May 28, 1874

The question which Dr. Hodge asks he promptly and decisively answers: ‘What is Darwinism? it is atheism.

Leaving aside all subsidiary and incidental matters, let us consider–1. What the Darwinian doctrine is, and 2. How it is proved to be atheistic. Dr. Hodge’s own statement of it cannot be very much bettered:

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Essay: Design versus necessity

—by Asa Gray

DESIGN VERSUS NECESSITY.—DISCUSSION BETWEEN TWO READERS OF DARWIN’S TREATISE ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES, UPON ITS NATURAL THEOLOGY.

(American Journal of Science and Arts, September, 1860)

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DAR 247
Henrietta Darwin's diary

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Charles Darwin’s daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and July 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University Library (DAR 247). They are published in volume 19 of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin (CUP 2012) and reproduced here with the permission of the Darwin family and of Cambridge University Press.  Her diary has been transcribed in its entirety; two pages have been excised from the notebook immediately following the last entry and one page has been excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself.

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ice_bag_treatment.jpg

1873 advertisement for John Chapman’s spinal ice bag treatment.
Internet Archive/Open Knowledge Commons/Harvard Medical School, http://archive.org/details/casesofneuralgia00chap

Darwin's notes for his physician, 1865

On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher who had studied medicine in London and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 Chapman started to treat epilepsy with ice and developed a theory of ‘neuro-dynamic medicine’ according to which many diseases were treatable through applications of heat or cold to the spine over long periods.

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